medievalpoc:

rafi-dangelo:

Most of my future children tag is cute brown children being fabulous and clearly belonging to me in spirit, but I’m making an exception for this tweet because if I don’t raise my kids to give that exact same response, then I have failed as a parent.

Who is this woman and can I send her a thank-you gift basket and a Black Parenting Award?  This is why it is imperative that we teach our children real history outside of textbooks constructed by, written for, and approved by white men whose re-telling of history conveniently glosses over atrocities and minimizes suffering.

"bold new idea"

I want to go to that school and set fire to every history book in the building.

Calling the enslavement of millions of people a “bold new idea” is pretty immoral itself, if you ask me.

In case anyone needs more context for why these students in Colorado are fighting for their AP History courses

Because students and educators in Arizona have already had their entire Ethnic studies curriculum outlawed, and have tried to gather these marginalized histories into underground libraries

In Texas in 2010, textbooks that are currently used all over the U.S. and even some districts in Canada were given a conservative “makeover” by elected officials to the outrage of historians...

This is happening all over the United States, and I hope people are paying attention. We are tired of seeing our histories erased.

(via nopejuststop)

socialjusticekoolaid:

Last Night in Ferguson (9.28-9.29): Last night’s protest was one of the in Ferguson this month, proving once again that the residents of Ferguson/STL County are some of the most resilient and inspiring in all the land. The police were literally holding peaceful protesters hostage late into the night (folks who were complying with all police requests) so they could negotiate with the remaining folks to leave, but the protesters didn’t back down. Eventually all arrestees were released, and many plan to be back out there tonight.

Injustice in Ferguson continues, but despite this, community now thrives too. This is still happening. Are you still paying attention? #staywoke #farfromover

(via amehaya)

hey, but if you find “multiculturalism” in the form of teaching about historical, political, artistic and or fictional figures associated with realities and cultures that students might identify with (but that are not present in the dominant white-American-middle class-democracy narrative) to be DIVISIVE, then you’re exactly the person that’s being urged to look at your privilege and that’s because you’re unwilling to loose the tight grasp that people with your privileges have on dictating who’s represented, whose realities are at least referenced in the school setting, what’s excluded for the sake of “inclusive” classrooms that don’t divide students based on race or culture, and finally which students feel comfortable in classrooms or continue to find school useful to them

sorryexcuseforsorry:

ssissterss:

SSISSTERSS is a new quarterly webzine highlighting the creative work of queer women artists. 

Find Issue #1 and #2 available free online at ssissterss.com and follow us on instagram @ssissterss.

Featuring interviews and work by Ramdasha Bikceem, Gabby Miller, Celeste Marie Welch, Factory Girls, Terry X, Grace Rosario Perkins, and more. 

We are currently seeking contributors for issue #3 and beyond. Please e-mail info@ssissterss.com with interest. 

These awesome grrls asked for some help promoting their project. GET INTO IT!

(via uglygirlsclub)

thepeoplesrecord:

The Ferguson protests aren’t over. Here’s why they picked up again this week
September 29, 2014

A desecrated memorial and comments from a police chief this week brought the simmering tensions between the black residents of Ferguson, Missouri, and local law enforcement to a boil once again, sparking an escalation in protests in the St. Louis suburb during the past several days.

These latest protests were the largest and most volatile since the initial demonstrations that took place for several weeks after Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson shot unarmed black 18-year-old Michael Brownon August 9. The first few weeks of protests, which played out through much of August, captured national media attention as demonstrators took to the streets to speak out against what many saw as a history of discrimination by the local government and police against the black community.

Throughout most of September, the tensions appeared to die down. But a couple of events this week, starting with a burned memorial to Brown, were enough to reinvigorate the protests, indicating that the underlying issues and racial tensions in Ferguson are far from resolved.

A desecrated memorial and comments from a police chief this week brought the simmering tensions between the black residents of Ferguson, Missouri, and local law enforcement to a boil once again, sparking an escalation in protests in the St. Louis suburb during the past several days.

These latest protests were the largest and most volatile since the initial demonstrations that took place for several weeks after Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson shot unarmed black 18-year-old Michael Brownon August 9. The first few weeks of protests, which played out through much of August, captured national media attention as demonstrators took to the streets to speak out against what many saw as a history of discrimination by the local government and police against the black community.

Throughout most of September, the tensions appeared to die down. But a couple of events this week, starting with a burned memorial to Brown, were enough to reinvigorate the protests, indicating that the underlying issues and racial tensions in Ferguson are far from resolved.

Some residents suggested to St. Louis TV station KSDK that the fire was intentional. “We know it wasn’t an accident,” one protester told KSDK. “You know how many people live over there that seen it from the beginning? I mean it’s just a big old flame. You could tell the way it was set.”

The ensuing protests at Canfield and West Florissant streets, where much of the initial demonstrations took place, at times got violent. CNN reported five arrests after people threatened police with gunshots, rocks, and bottles, and one person reportedly threw a Molotov cocktail at a parking structure. Two officers were injured, and one business was broken into, Missouri Highway Patrol Captain Ron Johnson told media.

Perhaps in response to the Tuesday protest, Ferguson Police Chief Tom Jackson, in a video posted Thursday, recognized several of his police department’s mistakes in the aftermath of the shooting. The apology was long sought by the Brown family and protesters.

Jackson apologized to the Brown family for keeping Brown’s body in the street for hours as officers investigated the scene. He also acknowledged the feelings of distrust toward the police within Ferguson’s black community, and he appeared to express some regret for how police, which at first responded with a militarized presence to largely peaceful demonstrators, handled the protests.

"The right of the people to peacefully assemble is what the police are here to protect," he said. "If anyone who was peacefully exercising that right is upset and angry, I feel responsible, and I’m sorry."

But the day before, on Wednesday, Jackson told CNN that police will continue using riot gear if the situation escalates. “We cannot have nights like last night,” he said “We can’t have actions like last night that can result in injury or death. Those will not be tolerated.”

In another interview with CNN, Jackson also said that, despite his mistakes, he will not step down. “I’ve talked to a lot of people who have initially called for [my resignation] and then have changed their mind after having meetings and discussions about moving forward,” Jackson said. “Realistically, I’m going to stay here and see this through. You know, this is mine, and I’m taking ownership of it.”

Demonstrators appeared to take Jackson’s video apology as too little, too late. They again took to the streets on Thursday night and the weekend, some reportedly demanding that the police chief resign. Despite Jackson’s attempt to march with protesters on Thursday night, the situation once again escalated into violent clashes and arrests.

Full article

(via anarcho-queer)

if u tryna buy this in a unisexxxx medium : 

theres 2 left @ BESTFRIENDS4EVIL

zzz

ok ill take it

jaezbrainlint:

On September 26, the Goodblanket family along with several native organizations hosted a rally against police brutality at the Oklahoma State Capitol. Here are a few recordings of the speeches that were given.

50 days, 19 hours since Mike Brown was killed.

hasdarrenwilsonbeenarrestedyet:

Yahoo News: Ferguson police say no use-of-force report exists about the shooting of Michael Brown shooting

100 more days until Grand Jury deadline.

(via mamichvla)

reblog if u hate capitalism but u still want to make money because you need money to survive capitalism lmao i’m sad

(Source: maywaver, via ethiopienne)

im sleep

"These are forms of male aggression that only women see. But even when men are afforded a front seat to harassment, they don’t always have the correct vantage point for recognizing the subtlety of its operation. Four years before the murders, I was sitting in a bar in Washington, D.C. with a male friend. Another young woman was alone at the bar when an older man scooted next to her. He was aggressive, wasted, and sitting too close, but she smiled curtly at his ramblings and laughed softly at his jokes as she patiently downed her drink. ‘Why is she humoring him?’ my friend asked me. ‘You would never do that.’ I was too embarrassed to say: ‘Because he looks scary’ and ‘I do it all the time.’

Women who have experienced this can recognize that placating these men is a rational choice, a form of self-defense to protect against setting off an aggressor. But to male bystanders, it often looks like a warm welcome, and that helps to shift blame in the public eye from the harasser and onto his target, who’s failed to respond with the type of masculine bravado that men more easily recognize."

Why it’s so hard for men to see misogyny (via ethiopienne)

BOOOM.  Read this if you are a dude, please.

(via geekyjessica)

Yesssssss.

(via quothtehblackbirdnevermoar)

Its hard for men to understand why women dont get loud & angry because they havent spent their entire lives being reprimanded whenever they take up too much space. (via pluralfloral)

(via scissortailmuse)

stringsdafistmcgee:

la-negra-barbuda:

nezua:

THE ONGOING SAGA OF THE FRAGILE WHITE

The Daily Show aired its long awaited segment on the Washington, D.C., NFL team name, in which fans were confronted by Natives on the set.

Before it even aired, the segment proved controversial. The satirical cable television news program had recruited team fans for the segment via Twitter; four were ultimately chosen to participate. But those participants told the Washington Post they felt like they were attacked.

Kelli O’Dell, who says it was unfair for The Daily Show to have her debate Amanda Blackhorse—the lead plaintiff in Blackhorse v. Pro-Football, Inc., which resulted in cancelling six of the team’s trademarks—says she felt like she was placed “in danger.” O’Dell later called authorities to pull The Daily Show tapes she had consented to appear on:

Two days later, O’Dell said she called D.C. police and tried to submit a police report, but authorities told her no crime had been committed.

People want their right to be racist. But the minute they approach facing real life consequences—and mild ones, given what they should expect for years of violence and slurs—look how they shake and cry. Look how they flee and fly to the po-lice, understanding fully the institutional role played by cops.

she tried to file a police report, hahahahaha! foolish.

LMFAO

(via the-mestiza-dyke-survival-guide)